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From the Patent Office Report (Report of the Commissioner of Patents for the Year 1855 - Arts and Manufactures.) Vol. 2. (Washington, D.C.: Cornelius Wendell, 1856) Text appears on page 223, illustration appears on page 316.
No. 12,451.—JOHN STULL.—Improved Stereoscope-Case.—Patented February 27, 1855. (Plates, p. 316.)

   The inventor says: I do not claim constructing a stereoscope-case, with a single adjustable flap or supplementary lid within the case, as such invention has been made and used before in daguerreotype cases; but I claim constructing a stereoscopic-case, with the three jointed pieces, E E E, or their equivalents, so applied as to preserve at all times a perfect parallelism between that part of the case containing the lenses and the part which contains the figures, so that a perfect stereoscope is formed of the whole as described, and the two figures, B B, by binocular vision, are apparently formed into a solid figure, the whole being at the same time adapted to fold or close into a small flat case, (resembling the common daguerreotype-case) that may be conveniently carried about the person, if so required, substantially as described. (See engravings.)

Notice of the patent appeared in the Scientific American. Vol. 10, No. 26 (10 March 1855) pg. 206 under the heading of "List of Patent Claims issued from the United States Patent Office":

   STEREOSCOPIC CASE.—John Stull, of Philadelphia Pa.: Having thus described the construction and operation of my invention, I proceed to state that I do not claim constructing a stereoscope case, with a single adjustable flap or supplementary lid within the case, as such invention has been made and used before in daguerreotype cases.
   But I claim constructing a stereoscopic case with the three jointed pieces, E E E, or their equivalents, so applied as to preserve at all times a perfect parallelism between that part of the case containing the lenses, and the part which contains the figures, so that a perfect stereoscope is formed of the whole, as described, and the two figures, B B, by binocular vision are apparently formed into a solid figure, the whole being at the same time adapted to fold or close into a small flat case (resembling the common daguerreotype case) that may be conveniently carried about the person, if so required, substantially as described.

(End of text. Please refer to our textnote regarding this text.)

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